Meet the 2016 Flipgrid Heroes

Thank you to all who applied for our 2016 Flipgrid Heroes Fellowship, and to everyone who continues to serve as an advocate for student voice. The work you do is incredibly important, and we are fortunate to be part of such a passionate and innovative community. 

In support of their efforts to champion student voice, Flipgrid Heroes will receive a $500 fellowship, a one-year Flipgrid license/extension, a Flipgrid Heroes hooded sweatshirt, and a Flipgrid pack of fun goods. 

Congratulations to the 2016 Flipgrid Heroes!

Chris Staple, Dong Thap University

Alex Fischer, Tanglen Elementary

Rich Perry, Calhoun High School

Jennifer Saarinen, Kickemuit Middle School

Andy Plemmons, David C Barrow Elementary

Marion Holland, Mann Elementary

Nicole LaFave, Fort Mills High School

Jayme Linton, Lenoir-Rhyne University

Radio Cremata, Ithaca College

Roopali Phadke, Macalester College

International Studies Elementary School uses Flipgrid to Reflect on Reading

After reading the story The Very Last First Time by Jan Andrews, Karen Liebert, the library media specialist at International Studies Elementary Charter School in Albany, Georgia, had her students record their analyses of the main character, Eva. Read about the experience on her blog or jump right to her students' amazing responses here.

Wonderful use of Flipgrid, Karen, we love watching your students confidently share their voices.

Flipgrid Story: Nicole LaFave

Nicole is a 9th and 10th grade English teacher in Fort Mill, South Carolina. One of the biggest challenges she faces is class discussion, which is often dominated by a few outgoing individuals. She turned to Flipgrid, hoping it would help her provide a voice to all her students, especially her quietest students. 

When we reached out to Nicole, she quickly and jubilantly responded “my students and I absolutely LOVE Flipgrid! It's a great way for my shy students to participate in class discussions... and for my not shy students to show off their personalities in those same discussions. I can't wait to use Flipgrid with my new group of energetic 9th grade kiddos!” We were thrilled to hear how Nicole empowers all of her students with Flipgrid, so we followed up to find out more.

In which courses do you use Flipgrid and among how many students?  

I use it in all of my 9th and 10th grade English courses. I teach all levels of students, from Inclusion to Honors classes. Depending on the course, class size ranges from 10-30 students. 

Describe when you first implemented Flipgrid into your classroom. How did you get your students on board? What discussions did you spur? 

I first used Flipgrid in March 2015. One of the wonderful things about English class is that literary discussions can go different directions in different classes on a daily basis. However, sometimes my students don't take it in the direction I'm trying to go. Instead of the teacher getting them there, however, I realized it might be more beneficial for their peers to point them in that direction. I decided to create a Flipgrid for my Honors English 2 students in which they compared the character of Cassius from Julius Caesar to a modern day real-life person or fictional character. The conversation ended up being so great that I tried it again the next week with my lower level English 1 students on a discussion about Romeo & Juliet. In the back of my mind, I thought that Flipgrid might be best for my students who were academically upper-level, but I couldn't have been more wrong!
I don't know how I got my students on board... I sort of made it mysterious in that I didn't tell them what we were doing; I just pulled them out into the hall to record their responses. When all was said and done, they were excited to see themselves and their peers on the big screen.

How often do you use Flipgrid with your students?

In the past, I've used it a few times a semester, but this year, I'm committing myself to doing some sort of Flipgrid activity every other week in class.

How do you generate topics to discuss on Flipgrid?

The topics mostly come from what we would have discussed in a Socrative Seminar setting. While these seminars are great and beneficial in a lot of ways, they often take 1-3 class periods to complete. Flipgrid has allowed me to open up more in-class time for other activities.

What’s an example of a topic you’ve sparked on Flipgrid?

The Shakespearean Insults grid has to be my favorite. This was meant to be something simple and fun and it turned into a grid that was viewed more than 3,000 times in less than a week. Students recorded the insults in private (I thought it might make them more willing to get really insulting -- we've done this live in a class before and few students are willing to really get into it). They turned out so well (some of my silent students shocked me with their sass!), that I decided to turn it into a competition of sorts where the videos with the most views/likes would receive a prize. I feel pretty convinced that every 9th grade student at my school saw the video and voted.

How do you plan on using Flipgrid this year? Do you have any new ideas?

I tried a new idea last week: I printed out 20 random questions (like "If your house was on fire and you could only save three items, what would they be?" and "If you could time travel only once, where would you go and why?"). Students selected one question and had the night to think about their answers. The next day, we recorded the questions and answers on Flipgrid.  I then shared the grid with students and parents (and we even watched it all the way through in class). While there was not necessarily any academic merit to this activity, I enjoyed getting to know a little about my students and I think they enjoyed getting to know a little about each other.
I'd like to continue using Flipgrid in the way that I have -- to spark discussion and for students to see and hear the responses of their classmates, but I'm constantly looking for new ways to use it. 

What is your favorite aspect of Flipgrid?

Just one? I love everything about Flipgrid. It gives all my students a voice. In my 9 years as an educator, I've never been able to say that about any other product.

In what ways has Flipgrid influenced the way you educate? 

I'm an English teacher, so I make my students write. Lots. Because of this, I'm always aware of their literary thoughts. But some of my most brilliant students over the years have been the quiet ones. I used to beg them to contribute to class discussions to no avail. I even got to a point of desperation where some of our class discussions were graded (this was not a proud moment as a teacher, I'll admit). With Flipgrid, I no longer have to worry about my quiet students. They can simply take an iPad in the hall or record in the privacy of their own home and VOILA! -- they are instantly a part of the discussion.

Your students are fortunate to have you, Nicole! Your story is inspiring and we’re thrilled to have you in our Flipgrid family. We look forward to hearing about your continued success and promotion of student voice!

Conquering Next Generation Science and Common Core Standards

We’re grateful to be among a community of educators who go above and beyond to ensure they’re inspiring their students in innovative ways. When challenged with the Next Generation Science or Common Core Standards, Flipgrid teachers exceed “standard” and stimulate active, engaged learning.

We've identified a series of ways in which your students can achieve these objectives with Flipgrid. For additional standards-aligned integration docs, visit our new Flipgrid Integration Center.

Build a community of young pioneers in Scientific investigation.

  • Conjure a range of radical questions by creating a topic for students to inquire about the natural or designed word (K-2-ETS1-1).
  • Pass out the goggles and lab coats, task students with designing an experiment, and then ask them to reflect on results (MS-PS1-2).
  • Create a Flipgrid topic for scientific inquiry and revelation by having students identify connections between seemingly unconnected findings (CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.9).
  • Have students explain variations of various traits in the human population (HS-LS3-3).

Use peer-to-peer learning to grow and develop English Language Arts skills.

Stimulate another level of cognitive thinking by having students verbalize their Mathematical problem solving.

  • Instead of simply jotting down the result, ask that students walk you through how they derived the answer (CCSS.MATH.PRACTICE.MP1).
  • Have them explain their reasoning or critique their peer's reasoning (CCSS.MATH.PRACTICE.MP3).

Spur debate and exploration in Social Studies.

  • Have students interpret graphical information (CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RST.9-10.7).
  • After studying a historical event, conduct a debate wherein students "pick a side" on a historical decision, defend their arguments, and respond to their opponents (CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.8).

Continue making your classroom a hub of powerful, active learning by implementing these Flipgrid strategies and, in doing so, create an enthusiastic, empowered community.

Introducing the All-New Flipgrid

Editor's Note: As of June 18, 2018, all of Flipgrid (formally our premium "Flipgrid Classroom") is free! Check out the details over here!

Offering both educators and students a refreshed interface, slew of new features, and overall upgraded experience, the all-new Flipgrid is more powerful than ever and still innately simple. Learn how in the video below.

Unlimited Responses. Unlimited Topics. Unlimited Grids.

With Flipgrid 4.0 we've made our simple educator pricing even better. For $65 a year, teachers can now create as many grids and topics as they'd like, share with whoever they want, and collect an unlimited number of responses.

Take student conversation to the next level, literally.

We've heard it a lot: our users want to allow the members of their community to respond directly to each other’s responses. Now they can. Educators can enhance their active, social classroom by allowing students to build on other’s ideas or challenge a peer’s logic, provide direct feedback, or answer questions.

Say “cheese,” then say some more.

Flipgrid has been completely redesigned to make genuine discussion easier and more intuitive. Videos are higher quality, load faster, and can be viewed from any device.

More customization and more integration.

The refreshed admin dashboard lets you personalize grids with custom banners, toggle settings - including likes - on or off, and share or embed Flipgrid wherever you’d like.

Join the conversation, anywhere.

With a social-media-feel, the new Flipgrid Android and iOS apps are modeled on student’s familiarity with the apps they already use. They remain intuitive, discussion-focused, and free with an updated look and feel. Using your unique grid code, students can easily join the conversation from their mobile or tablet device.

Get on the grid.

Start your Flipgrid experience today with a free trial. Already a Flipgrid admin? All existing accounts have been automatically upgraded for free. Log in to start exploring!

The Need for Social Learning in the Workplace

Technological advancements are constantly changing the way we work. Teams are increasingly spread across time zones. They conduct their daily business without regular face-to-face interaction with peers. As a result, many organizations are finding it challenging to maintain and expand genuine communication and community among employees.

In her eLearning Industry article, “Why Your Workplace Needs Social and Collaborative Learning Technologies," Kali Blunt references a study conducted by the Association for Talent Development. “In high-performance organizations, employees share knowledge with their colleagues at a rate four times greater than that of workers in lower-performing firms. That communication is supported by rewarding workers for learning, providing tools and resources for creating and sharing learning content, and making knowledge sharing a performance expectation at all organizational levels.” 

Becoming a high-performance organization, Blunt notes, is primarily accomplished through social, interactive learning, which benefits the organization by:

  • connecting employees across space and time
  • growing a central, readily-accessible repository of learning content
  • balancing the formality of engagement
  • building community

Paramount to building a high performing workplace, she explains, is sharing. “Sharing is at the heart of learning. The people we work with are best supported when engaged in a community where profiles, teams, groups, forums, and activity streams can be harnessed through the power of social platform communities.”

Blunt's sentiment and call for active, social learning reflects the value of Flipgrid. Our primary objective is to foster community and collective learning in classrooms and corporations around the world while maintaining simplicity and ease of use. We overwhelmingly echo Blunt’s conclusion that “in the long run, we want people to feel connected, informed, and supported in the workplace. And that’s exactly what social and collaborative learning technologies can do through enterprise social networks.”